Biography
edited by Ines Millesimi

1965
Eros – Giancarlo, the name with which he was christened, is now just a memory stored in the births registry- Renzetti was born in Rome on the 8th of February. It might seem a quirk at first but Eros is the name his family has affectionately called him from the very beginning, given his startling resemblance to his brother, who was stillborn two thirteen months previously, and whose name was Eros.
Like Dalí, who always felt the inward presence of his brother, died three years before Dalí was born and who had looked a great deal like him, Eros too grew up with this arcane sentiment of the double. He soon began to dedicate himself to drawing and experimenting with various techniques since, from an early age, he had a notion that once he was an adult he would be an artist. A vivid memory that Eros would cherish from childhood was seeing the film Ziegfeld Follies starring Fred Astaire and being impressed by the sets and by the costumes worn for those perfectly synchronized and perfect dances.

1979-1985
From 1975 on he attended Istituto Statale d’Arte Roma I (ISA) in via Silvio d’Amico 111, leaving school with an Art teaching diploma in 1982. There he studied sculpture under the guidance of Carlo Lorenzetti as well as painting under Paolo Cotani. Both of these artists were well-known in the art world and not just in Italy or in Rome. These were the years when Lorenzetti was seeking a stark and spiritual lyricism in rigorously abstract form. The sign hovering in space is made up of the modulation of the reflecting sheet of metal, able to transmit a formal idea of freedom and lightness that is anti-monumental. Cotani, interested in the language of photography after rubbing shoulders with well-known American photographer, was the protagonist of an Analytical or New Painting, which came in the wake of the experimentations of Arte Povera. His art in those years achieved the essence of minimalism while never straying from the traditional repertoire of painting.
In 1984 Eros Renzetti was awarded his leaving school diploma in Applied Art at the Istituto d’Arte, graduating in Metal and Jewellery Art under Eliseo Mattiacci, another well-known international artist who, in the Eighties, explored the theme of astronomic space with works and installations that succeeded in transmitting a strong cosmic energy. Under Mattiacci, who was then a professor of enamels, he produced various masks made of enamelled copper. Eros picked up the art of designing jewellery with the greatest of ease, and he was able to develop this talent with the great professional who had worked with Cagli, Mirko, Afro and Cannilla in Rome in the Fifties for Mario Masenza the jeweller. From these brief notes, which sum up the schooling of the young Eros, a clear picture emerges of, firstly, what stimulating settings the classrooms of the Istituto d’Arte were then, and, secondly, what changes have taken place in the thirty years since he left to gradually limit the “practical” approach in the workshops of these schools which, in the wake of the educational reform, became Art lyceums. Thus, in a context where the broadest range of technical skills were taught, Eros designed jewellery and modelled small sculptures of mostly invented figures portrayed in hieratic poses. Meanwhile, he kept company with Italo Mussa, art critic and theoretician of the so-called Pittura Colta, consolidating an increasingly genuine interest in the art of figuration and discarding- despite maintaining a respect for and a consciousness of this type of expression- a form approaching abstract experimentation, installations and the most extreme contemporary trends which, all the same, had influenced his earliest training. He became increasingly attracted to the creative world of the theatre, of set-building, costumes and atmospheres that are spectacular in the way they unfold “in the here and now”. He saw the show Flowers, pantomima per Jean Genet starring Lindsay Kemp at the Teatro Brancaccio in Rome, and was totally mesmerised. He would have further opportunities to meet the great British mime artist, with whom he would exchange various drawings. In the meantime, in 1979, when Eros was just fourteen years old, some of his drawings were spotted by the visionary artist Fabrizio Clerici, a leading artist in Rome, in Italy, and abroad, whose expression was cultured and extremely sophisticated, hovering between metaphysical suspension and surrealism.
Encouraging Eros to pursue this path and to increasingly hone his techniques, Clerici invited him to visit his studios in Rome and in Barottoli, in the municipality of Monteroni d’Arbia. Siena. Here, in Barottoli, in the church hall adjoining the house, there is a contemporary copy of Rutilio Manetti’s seventeenth century painting Tentazione di Sant’Antonio, and it was precisely in this magical place that Leonardo Sciascia, on a visit to his friend Clerici, found the inspiration and idea for his book Todo Modo. Eros underwent a prolonged and pivotal apprenticeship at Fabrizio Clerici’s studio, becoming his assistant and sharing his home until he died in 1993.
From that moment on he took charge of preserving the memory of the artist and running his large historical archive. Thus Eros Renzetti had the opportunity to work alongside a highly independent artist who was difficult to pigeonhole in any group or category.
As Clerici was not just an artist but also a highly sophisticated intellectual, who was friendly with and held in esteem by eminent figures in the world of art, literature and international cinema, Renzetti was invited along on the numerous trips Clerici made in the Eighties to Egypt, Paris, and New York. Eros met a number of very different people at that time: Leonor Fini, Salvador Dalí, Federico Fellini, Dalida, Brigitte Bardot, Serge Gainsbourg, Rock Hudson, María Félix, François Mitterrand, Boris Kochno, Silvana Mangano, Alida Valli, Georges Perec, Ingrid Bergman, Isabella Far de Chirico, Vittorio Gassman, Laura Betti, Leonardo Sciascia, Hebert von Karajan, Giulietta Simionato…each of whom succeeded in leaving a deep impression on him, contributing to the development of his character, which was anxiously inquisitive, sensitive and very kind but also capable of asperity and aloofness.
In the meantime Renzetti made masks and costumes for various plays. It was in Paris and in Saint Dyé-sur-Loire that he fi rst met Leonor Fini, with whom he struck up a close friendship. They would continue to meet until her death in 1996, with and without the company of Fabrizio Clerici, who had been a friend of the painter since 1943. For Eros Leonor would become an enlightened muse, free
and unshackled to any historical period, inspirer of new dreams (they would spend entire evenings discussing Füssli and Pontormo). This meeting was not just intellectual magnetism or a random union of souls belonging to very different generations. Both shared the same artistic approach and working method (they exchanged drawings, postcards and photographs, which documented meetings, stories or events containing alchemical and theatrical elements).
Both had the same slow and controlled working method.
The brush-stroke had to be imperceptible, almost as though the image painted were a magical and spiritual apparition. Eros did a small oil portrait of Leonor in 1983 and others at different times, as a token of his admiration, while Eddy Brofferio, a mutual friend of Clerici and Leonor Fini, and a brilliant photographer who worked in both America and Europe, took various portraits of him, which now belong to the prestigious Alinari collection in Florence, seeing him almost as the reincarnation of a Caravaggio model.

1986-1991
Beginning in 1986 Eros took courses in set design taught by Fabio Vergoz as well as stagecraft taught by Giorgio Scalco at the Fine Arts Academy in Rome, graduating in 1990. Vergoz established the chairs of set design at the Fine Arts Academy in via Ripetta in Rome and at the Academy of Viterbo, and taught many Italian Oscar-winning set designers. His detailed stories of the sumptuous production he took part in at Cinecittà in 1959 on the set of Ben Hur were the stuff of legend with his students. Renzetti’s interest as a young set and costume designer was focussed mainly on ballet and dance theatre. He also met Kazuo Ohno, an important Butoh dancer. Due to its anti-narrative and the slow movement of the bodies which create, as in tableaux vivants, a suspension of time, this type of dance attracted him immensely, to the point that it influenced some of the drawings he produced at this time.
The subjects of his graphic work were, above all, imaginary halflength portraits of disturbing and devilish cardinals, traced with pencil or a silver nib. He also designed and produced an important set-sculpture for H.M. De Montherlant’s show Pasifae, staged at the Teatro Romano in Nora.

1992-1994
After seeing the anatomical waxes preserved in the museum of Le Specola in Florence, he painted a series of tablets which he would call Teste anatomiche, where the knot of veins and capillaries constitutes the structure of even more deeply disturbing faces. One of these tablets would be particularly admired by Leonor Fini, who would encourage Eros to further explore this visionary coté that investigates beneath the skin of things.
In Rome with Fabrizio Clerici he visited the Sistine Chapel and climbed up onto the scaffolding that had been erected for the restoration of the Last Judgement. In 1994 the National Academy of San Luca purchased il Ritratto di Fabrizio Clerici, painted by Eros in the summer of 1992 at the artist’s studio in Barottoli in the countryside near Siena, for its picture gallery.

1995-1999
He held his fi rst solo exhibition at the Cà d’Oro gallery in Rome, where he exhibited twenty works, including eight paintings and twelve works on paper. A dedication from Leonor Fini, written for the occasion, was published in the catalogue: “Dear Giancarlo, when I look for a long time at your lovely drawing of the face, which perhaps is bizarrely masked, and also that soft light that veils the two creatures that burn with desire for one another, one sees from your artistic touch the contradiction that engulfs everything and instils fear”. In 1996 The Best magazine dedicated an article to him written by Charles Reynaud des Sablon. He exhibited a large painting with the title Visioni sonore at the Studio S-Arte Contemporanea gallery in Rome on the occasion of the exhibition Corpo a corpo. Tre maniere di guardare al corpo. He took part in the Sixth International Biennial in Cairo with Password, an oil painting of vast proportions. A monographic issue of “Psicoanalisi Contro” magazine came out illustrated with his drawings and paintings. In 1998 he was invited by Alitalia to show his work in various group exhibitions. He designed the graphics for a pull-out that came with the magazine Freccia Alata News (no. 4, 1998). In the following year he held a solo exhibition at the J.F. Kennedy Airport in New York and produced a silk screen painting on silver sheeting for the Pegaso prize.

2000-2007
The protagonists of the series of paintings with which he inaugurated the new century were bodies and faces which emerged within iridescent spaces generating mysterious nonsenses with a forceful visionary impact. He also produced Testa alata and Pegaso, two numbered silkscreen paintings. In 2002 he produced a painting on Cleopatra shown in the group exhibition Cleopatra at the Egypt Academy in Rome and, subsequently, in a travelling exhibition in Egypt and the Republic of Azerbaijan. In April 2003 he inaugurated the exhibition Cleopatra. Da Michelangelo all’Arte Contemporanea at the Alexandria Center of Art in Alexandria in Egypt; the same exhibition was subsequently moved to the Akhnatoon Center of Arts-Zamalek. In July he produced two paintings for the Giffoni Film Festival shown in the group exhibition Un mondo d’immagini per chi immagina il mondo. In 2004 he took part in the contemporary art exhibition Salone di Maggio. La natura e l’uomo in Rome at the Monument to Vittorio Emanuele II. He also showed Opium, a specially painted tempera, in the exhibition Uroburo o dell’Eterno Ritorno (omaggio a Cocteau) held at the Archivio di Stato di Parma in 2005. In December he exhibited in New York at J.F. Kennedy Airport and saw the publication of his fi rst monograph. The paintings dating from 2004 to 2007, executed using mixed technique, some of which were large format, focussed on male subjects of knights and warriors, represented tone on tone on luminescent and monochromatic backgrounds. Blocked in static poses, or encapsulating a moment in time, these science fiction figures in profile, with aerodynamic helmets and bull necks, inherited the elongated, frontal eyes depicted by the Ancient Egyptians and Giotto, but also certain structural archaisms typical of the naked warriors of the temple of Athena Aphaia on Aigina.

2008-2010
In Milan he took part in the exhibition entitled Jean Cocteau le joli coeur. Omaggio ”alla moda” di un seduttore, Palazzo delle Stelline, Centre Culturel Français. In July 2009, within the sphere of the Giffoni Film Festival in Giffoni-Valle Piana (Salerno), he took part in the exhibition Artabù. Icone della trasgressione while, invited by Museo Revoltella in Trieste, he showed a painting in the exhibition entitled Leonor Fini L’Italienne de Paris, along with the works of artists including Dorothea Tanning, Pavel Tchelitchew and Jan Lebenstein in a section dedicated to well-known friends of the great surrealist artist. On this occasion celebrated visionary art expert Laura Gavioli, curator of the section, interviewed him about his relationship with Fabrizio Clerici and Leonor Fini. In 2009 he showed work in Rome in two group exhibitions entitled Maestri in grafi ca and La grafica d’autore dal ‘900 ad oggi and in the exhibition, curated by Carmine Siniscalco, entitled Muro contro muro, held on the occasion of the twentieth anniversary of the fall of the Berlin wall.
At the Silber Gallery in Rome, in an exhibition entitled Giovanni Cozzi Eros Renzetti Anteprima, he showed some photographs by celebrated fashion photographer Giovanni Cozzi alongside his sculptures, both linked by a strong sense of glamour. In 2010 he was invited by Galleria Cà d’Oro in Rome and by Fondazione de Chirico to take part in a travelling exhibition Omaggio a de Chirico, a group exhibition held at various venues (Sculpture Foundation of Bergamot Station, Los Angeles; New York University, New York; Saint Thomas High School, Miami). At the homonymous exhibition held in Rome in 2008 (Galleria Cà d’Oro, curated by Antonio and Gloria Porcella) Renzetti wrote this comment in the catalogue: “Before de Chirico came Georges; in my memories of adolescence that is what his wife Isabella Far called him, reminiscing about him in those long conversations with Fabrizio Clerici which I sat in on in the Eighties. Fabrizio often spoke of his brotherly connection with Alberto Savinio and of how he had swapped mostly painting and tempera recipes with Giorgio de Chirico as early as 1938. Subsequently I saw many publications and at the Art Institute I learned the titles of almost every one of his paintings by heart. But the first one I actually saw was Melanconia, painted in 1912, in London. What lingered with me after seeing some of his works ( I recall the large anthological exhibition in Rome at the Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Moderna) was the attitude of sweet abandon of many of his figures. It was a form of abandon, even though at times it was not so sweet, which I assimilated and blatantly mimicked in some of my paintings. Per de Chirico is my current homage to the painter of metaphysics: a digital elaboration which associates a little known painting of his – La profezia del saggio painted in 1915 – with one of my androgynous knights.”
In 2010 he showed his work in a solo exhibition in Rome entitled Di padre in figlio, held at the Galleria Monserrato Arte ‘900. While his object-sculptures of the Ritrovamenti series– heads made of different materials and in hybrid fi breglass, decorated to the point of hyperbole- reverse the sense of the memento mori of the celebrated skull made of platinum and eight thousand diamonds with which Damian Hirst scandalised the public in 2007, the ambiguous vanitas expressed by the beautiful male bodies of armigers which metamorphose into pink flamingos take us to a world of imagination made up of x-rays (capturing what lies under the skin of things) and dressing up (constructing lateral thinking and the personality), while continuing to shock with their glamour. Almost as though to mock again the absurd tragicomedy of the real, Eros began to experiment with cross-pollinations, but also with whimsicalities and with semblances. As in the past he took his lead from the old masters but, increasingly, turned to fantasy cinema. One finds surprising analogies between his knights at the end of the Nineties and some films, such as 300 (2007), directed by Zack Snyder, or the character of Jake Sully in Avatar (2009), directed by James Cameron, who somewhat resembles a head he painted in 2000. There is, moreover, no lack of oblique tangencies with pop music, with videos and with the staging of the shows of Madonna and Lady Gaga. This being in one’s own historical period in terms of the figurative imagination is, however, underpinned by a traditional mode of painting. Today Eros Renzetti still works employing a slow, controlled and perfect technique that involves a skilled dexterity which is not visible to the eye but is there nonetheless.

2011
In February he showed two works at the exhibition Quindici artisti in memoria della Shoah at the Old Jaffa Museum of Tel Aviv and was invited to the Venice Biennial where he exhibited at the Italy Pavilion curated by Vittorio Sgarbi. On this occasion Vincenzo Consolo wrote: “I chose to present artist Eros Renzetti at the Venice Biennale, in the Italy Pavilion at the Arsenale, because I found this artist’s work very striking and persuasive. His male figures with helmets, like the warrior of Dodona, seen in profi le, his “presences” of faces, his nudes, his “tattoos” and, above all, his colours, reminded me of the great surrealist painting of Leonor Fini, of Fabrizio Clerici or of Alberto Savinio”.
In May Damiani from the publisher prints the second artist’s monograph entitled Eros Renzetti. It happened one day with text by Vincenzo Mazzarella. The book is conceived as Damiani as a bizarre diary Renzetti with his personal photos, works and photos of his meetings. The volume is presented to the Library Arion of Rome in the palace of Fabio Benzi Exhibitions, Ines thousandths and Rosanna Ruscio; on that occasion the actor Massimo Napoli read some passages of Mazzarella.

2012
In May, the Palazzetto Art Gallery in Rome is organizing an exhibition of the artist entitled Eros Renzetti Lucha Libre with paintings and digital graphics. In July, he participated in the Happy Art organized by the Giffoni Film Festival in Giffoni. In the same month in Termoli opens La rètina lucente exhibition curated by Lorenzo Canova at the Galleria Civica d’Arte Contemporanea; They are presented in the exhibition of the great graphic artist printed on silver paper with the Lambda system; Canova writes in the catalog: “… the glamorous mask and indecipherable drawn with electron guns by Eros Renzetti, metaphor of an extraterrestrial beauty combining the iridescent skin of a reptile to stellar haughty features of a” cyborg model. The year continues with the participation in various group.

2013-2016
In April he participates all’Argam Rome staged at the Museum Venanzo Crocetti and in various group in 2014. In March 2015 he exhibited at the Palazzetto Art Gallery in Rome in a group dedicated to the Ides of March; on that occasion presents a great photograph that shows him in a tableau vivant in the role of Julius Caesar in the act of being stabbed. Paints an intense portrait of Pasolini for forty years after his death and his Shadow box is shown in the church of Saint Lucia del Gonfalone in Rome. He was invited by Vittorio Sgarbi Italian Art Expo staged in the villa Bagatti Valsecchi in Varedo. At the beginning of 2016 several collective exhibitions see its participation, both as a painter and creator of masks and costumes for performances.

Exhibitions

Solo

2015
Story of a year: Eros Renzetti. United artists in an unusual place (Storia di un anno: Eros Renzetti. Artisti uniti in un luogo non comune), edited by V. Mazzarella and P. Bielli, Rome, Church of Saint Lucia del Gonfalone, May 10-23, 2015

2012
Eros Renzetti Lucha Libre, edited by V. Mazzarella, Rome, Palazzetto Art Gallery, May 9-June 12, 2012

2011-2012
Eros Renzetti. Poker Faces, Rome, Billions, December 10, 2011-January 10, 2012

2010
From father to Son (Di padre in figlio), edited by V. Mazzarella, Rome, Galleria Monserrato Arte ‘900, October 21-November 12, 2010

2009-2010
Giovanni Cozzi Eros Renzetti Preview (Giovanni Cozzi Eros Renzetti Anteprima), Rome, Silber Gallery, December 12, 2009-February 12, 2010

2005-2006
Eros Renzetti, New York (U.S.A.), J.F. Kennedy Airport, December, May 2006

1999
Giancarlo Renzetti, New York (U.S.A.), J.F. Kennedy Airport, June-July 1999

1996
Body to body. Three ways of looking at the body. A.R.G.A.M. 1996 (Roman spring, 1996 – Art in Europe), (Corpo a corpo. Tre maniere di guardare al corpo. A.R.G.A.M. 1996, (Primaverile Romana 1996 – Arte in Europa), edited by C. Siniscalco, Rome, Studio S-Arte Contemporanea, April15- May 11, 1996

1995
Giancarlo Renzetti. Paintings and drawings (Giancarlo Renzetti. Dipinti e disegni), Rome, Ca’d’Oro d’Oro, June 26-July 26, 1995

Group

2016
From fragments of the sacred myth recomposition (Dai frammenti del sacro alla ricomposizione del mito), edited by R. Marino, Bovino, Circolo Culturale “F. Rossomandi” e Museo Civico “C. G. Nicastro” 31 July-15 August 2016

1846-2016 Ardent Spirits between art & photography (1846-2016 Spiriti Ardenti fra arte & fotografia)
, edited by M. Zattini, Cesena, Galleria Comunale d’Arte, July 16-September 25, 2016

Archaeologies to come. Metamorphosis of old and classic Italian contemporary art (Archeologie a venire. Metamorfosi dell’antico e del classico nell’arte contemporanea italiana), edited by S. Pegoraro, Vasto, Scuderie di Palazzo Aragona, July 9-October 23, 2016

ACcordaMenti Act V: Arachne and other metamorphoses (ACcordaMenti Atto V: Aracne e altre metamorfosi), edited by R. Giulieni, Rome, Varco, June 12-16, 2016

2015-2016

Jubilee, Pope Bergoglio by Jesuit or Franciscan (Giubileo, Papa Bergoglio da Gesuita a Francescano), Rome, Galleria Minima Contemporanea, December 12, 2015-January 30, 2016

Seven works for the Misericordia (Sette opere per la Misericordia), Rome, Monserrato Arte ‘900, December 8, 2015-January 10, 2016

Gold, frankincense and miter (Oro, incenso e mitra), Rome, Galleria Arte e Pensieri, December 5, 2015-January 9, 2016

2015

Expo Italian Art, edited by V. Sgarbi, Varedo (MB), Villa Bagatti Valsecchi June 19-October 31, 2015

Open Entry, edited by M. Tosto, Rome, Galleria Minima Contemporanea, November 14-December 5, 2015

Pier Paolo Pasolini exhibition space to expressive space (Pier Paolo Pasolini da spazio espositivo a spazio espressivo), Ostia (RM), Teatro del Lido di Ostia, October 21-November 30, 2015

Without Network (Senza Rete), edited by M. Tosto, Rome, Galleria Minima Contemporanea, July 10-September 5, 2015

Pier Paolo Pasolini exhibition space to expressive space (Pier Paolo Pasolini da spazio espositivo a spazio espressivo), Rome, Galleria Minima Contemporanea, May 8-June 27, 2015

Tu quoque. Artists for the Assassination of Julius Caesar (Tu quoque. Artisti per il cesaricidio), Rome, Palazzetto Art Gallery, March 15-April 15, 2015

Art for Porn, curated by The Girls of Porn, Milan, Galleria Le Dictateur March 27-29, 2015

2014
Love letter (Lettera d’amore), edited by V. Mazzarella, Rome, Monserrato Arte ‘900, June 12-July 12, 2014

Art for Porn, Rome, Studio Marco Delogu, March 29-30 , 2014

Unifotunart, edited by A. Ozzella, Benevento, Università degli studi Giustino Fortunato, April 24-May 28, 2014

2013
The next could be you (Il prossimo potresti essere tu), edited by V. Mazzarella, Rome, Monserrato Arte ‘900, December 8-30, 2013

Invitation to Palazzetto n. 4 (Invito a Palazzetto n. 4), Rome, Palazzetto Art Gallery, May 21-July 31, 2013

Invitation to Palazzetto n. 3 (Invito a Palazzetto n. 3), Rome, Palazzetto Art Gallery, Rome 4-March 19, 2013

The gallery owner failed salt of a galaxy or hiding inside the remains of St. Benedict Joseph Labre (Il gallerista fallito sale su una galassia o si nasconde dentro le spoglie di San Benedetto Giuseppe Labre), edited by V. Mazzarella, Rome, Monserrato Arte ‘900, March 4-29, 2013

Argamarte to Museum Crocetti (Argamarte al Museo Crocetti), edited by C. Siniscalco, Museo Venanzo Crocetti, April 19-May 6, 2013

2012-2013
The Dolce Vita at Vie En Rose (Dalla Dolce Vita alla Vie En Rose), edited by C. Siniscalco, Studio S-Arte Contemporanea, December 3 2012-January 5, 2013

2012
Invitation to Palazzetto n. 2 (Invito a Palazzetto n. 2)
, Rome, Palazzetto Art Gallery, October 17-November 7, 2012

Rosa Rosae Rosae Rosam … The decline of the rose (Rosa Rosae Rosae Rosam …Il declinare della rosa), edited by C. Siniscalco, Rome, Studio S-Arte Contemporanea, October 5-31, 2012

Invitation to Palazzetto n. 1 (Invito a Palazzetto n. 1), Rome, Palazzetto Art Gallery, March 14-21, 2012

The look in the Immaculate Conception (Lo sguardo nel giorno dell’Immacolata Concezione), edited by V. Mazzarella, Rome, Monserrato Arte ‘900, December 8-23, 2012

St. John the Merciful (San Giovanni l’Elemosiniere), edited by V. Mazzarella, Rome, Monserrato Arte ‘900 October 27-November 15, 2012

Dedicated to Ivan (Dedicato a Ivan), edited by V. Mazzarella, Rome, Monserrato Arte ‘900, March 4-28, 2012

The shiny retina (La rètina lucente), edited by L. Canova, Termoli, Galleria Civica d’Arte Contemporanea, July 22-September 16, 2012

Giffoni Film Festival, Giffoni Experience 2012, Happy Art, edited by S. Colantuoni, Giffoni Valle Piana (Salerno), Complesso Monumentale San Francesco, July 15-24, 2012

2011-2012
The sign of Italy (Il segno d’Italia), edited by V. Mazzarella, Palazzetto Art Gallery, December 8, 2011-January 8, 2012

2011
The only virginity is in the look (L’unica verginità è nello sguardo), edited by V. Mazzarella, Rome, Monserrato Arte ‘900, December 8-11, 2011

Recovered masterpieces. And the artists at the Venice Biennale of Monserratoarte Gallery ‘900 (Capolavori Ritrovati. E gli artisti alla Biennale di Venezia della Galleria Monserratoarte ‘900), edited by V. Mazzarella, Rome, Monserrato Arte ‘900, July 14-31, 2011

54. International Art Exhibition La Biennale di Venezia (54. Esposizione Internazionale d’Arte La Biennale di Venezia), edited by V. Sgarbi, Venice, Italy Arsenale Pavilion, Giardini-Arsenale June 4, November 27, 2011

Beyond the Dark (Oltre il buio), edited by B. Palma, A. Pepe, V. Mazzarella, Rome, Minima, June 15-July 12, 2011

Italy is a dream color (L’Italia è un colore sognato), edited by R. Giulieni and V. Mazzarella, Rome, Monserrato Arte ‘900, March 17-April 8, 2011

Hide the stone which Cain can not find it (Nascondi la pietra che Caino non la trovi), Lecco, Torre Viscontea, February 13-March 6, 2011

Fifteen artists in memory of the Shoah (Quindici artisti in memoria della Shoah), edited by C. Siniscalco, Tel Aviv, Old Jaffa Museum, February 1-28, 2011

Before of Lent” Men, saints, gods, clowns and confetti (“Prima della Quaresima” Uomini, Santi, Dei, pagliacci e coriandoli), edited by V. Mazzarella and R. Giulieni, Rome, Monserrato Arte ‘900, January- 28-February 25, 2011

2010-2011
In the day of the Immaculate Conception to you we give the beauty in the form of perversion (Nel giorno dell’Immacolata Concezione a voi diamo la bellezza nella perversione della forma), edited by P. Bielli, V. Mazzarella, R. Giulieni, Rome, Monserrato Arte ‘900, December 8-December 10, 2011

2010
Wall against Wall, without pity (Muro contro muro, senza pietà)
, edited by C. Siniscalco, Padula (SA), Certosa di San Lorenzo, Antica Spezieria, April 22-May 9, 2010

Homage to de Chirico (Omaggio a de Chirico), edited by A. and G. Porcella, Los Angeles, Sculpture Foundation of Bergamot Station, Santa Monica, Los Angeles, April, 2010

Wall against Wall (Muro contro muro), edited by C. Siniscalco, Salerno, Punto Einaudi, February 27-March 20, 2010

Homage to de Chirico (Omaggio a de Chirico), edited by A. and G. Porcella, New York, New York University, February 15-March 15, 2010

Homage to de Chirico (Omaggio a de Chirico), edited by A. and G. Porcella, Miami, Saint Thomas High School, January 18, 201

2009-2010
Cards of author (Carte d’autore), edited by C. Siniscalco, Rome, Studio S-Arte Contemporanea, December 21, 2009-January 18, 2010

2009
Homage to de Chirico (Omaggio a de Chirico), edited by A. and G. Porcella, Rome, Galleria Ca’d’Oro and various venues, November 30, 2009

Wall against Wall (Muro contro muro), edited by C. Siniscalco, Rome, Studio S-Arte Contemporanea, November 9-December 5, 2009

The great masters of the graphic. The graphics of author from ‘900 to date (I grandi Maestri della grafica. La grafica d’autore dal ‘900 ad oggi), Rome, Galleria L’Indicatore, October 10, 2009

Masters in graphic, The of author graphics from ‘900 to date (Maestri in grafica, La grafica d’autore dal ‘900 ad oggi), Roma, Silber Gallery, July 23-September 30, 2009

Leonor Fini L’Italienne de Paris, edited by M. Masau Dan, Trieste, Museo Revoltella, July 4-October 4, 2009

Giffoni Film Festival. Artabù. Transgression Icons (Giffoni Film Festival. Artabù. Icone della trasgressione), edited by S. Colantuoni, Giffoni-Valle Piana (Salerno), Convento di San Francesco, July 15-25, 2009

2008
Homage to de Chirico (Omaggio a de Chirico), edited by A. and G. Porcella, Rome, Galleria Ca’d’Oro, November 6-December 6, 2008

Jean Cocteau le joli coeur. Tribute “to fashion” a deceiver (Jean Cocteau le joli coeur. Omaggio ”alla moda” di un seduttore), edited by M. Carrera, Milan, Palazzo delle Stelline, Centre culturel français, October 24-December 4, 2008

2007
Spring A.R.G.A.M. 2007. Spring Fair. Research and In Praise of Form, first edition (Primaverile A.R.G.A.M. 2007. Salone di Primavera. Ricerca ed Elogio della Forma, prima edizione), edited by C. Siniscalco, Rome, Museo Venanzo Crocetti, May 22-June 22, 2007

The new-found form, paintings by contemporary artists (La forma ritrovata, dipinti di artisti contemporanei), Rome, Galleria Il Riquadro, October 2007

2005
Uroburo or the Eternal Return (tribute to Cocteau) (Uroburo o dell’Eterno Ritorno (omaggio a Cocteau), edited by M. Carrera, Parma, Archivio di Stato, October 1-31, 2005

2004
May Salon. Nature and man (Salone di maggio. La natura e l’uomo), edited by C. Siniscalco, Rome, Complesso del Vittoriano, May 7-26, 2004

Cleopatra. From Michelangelo to Contemporary Art (Cleopatra. Da Michelangelo all’Arte Contemporanea), edited by C. Siniscalco, Baku (Azerbaijan), Museum Shirvanshakh, the Throne Room, December 19- 29, 2004

2003
Cleopatra. From Michelangelo to Contemporary Art (Cleopatra. Da Michelangelo all’Arte Contemporanea), edited by C. Siniscalco, Alexandria (Egypt), Alexandria Center of Art, April 2003

Cleopatra. From Michelangelo to Contemporary Art (Cleopatra. Da Michelangelo all’Arte Contemporanea), edited by C. Siniscalco, Cairo (Egypt), Akhnatoon Center of Arts-Zamalek, June 2003

Giffoni Film Festival. A world of images to those who imagine the world. Declinations of the universe youth art (Giffoni Film Festival. Un mondo di immagini per chi immagina il mondo. Declinazioni d’arte sull’universo giovanile), edited by M. Duranti, Giffoni-Valle Piana (Salerno), Convento di San Francesco, July 19-28, 2003

New surrealism, visionary and fantastic (Nuovo surrealismo, visionario e fantastico), Rapolano Terme (Siena), Antica Grancia, July 2003

2002
Cleopatra, edited by C. Siniscalco, Rome, Accademia d’Egitto, May 16-June 16, 2002

Cleopatra, edited by C. Siniscalco, Rome, Studio S-Arte Contemporanea, June 19-July 25, 2002

1999-2000
What a beautiful (the) figure! (Che bella (la) figura!), edited by C. Siniscalco, Rome, Studio S-Arte Contemporanea, November 20, 1999-January 21, 2000

1999
Artists for 705ª Celestine Pardon (Artisti per la 705ª Perdonanza Celestiniana), L’Aquila, Fortezza Spagnola, August 14-September 26, 1999

1998-1999
Thirty artists Umbria Jazz Winter (Trenta artisti per Umbria Jazz Winter), Orvieto, Palazzo del Popolo, December 28, 1998- January 10, 1999

1998
Twenty-four artists for Umbria Jazz (Ventiquattro artisti per Umbria Jazz), Perugia, Rocca Paolina, July 10-19, 1998

1997-1998
50 in Black and White (50 in Bianco e Nero), edited by C. Siniscalco, Rome, Studio S-Arte Contemporanea, November 25, 1997- January 5, 1998

1997
Reports, A.R.G.A.M. 1997 (Segnalazioni, A.R.G.A.M. 1997), edited by C. Siniscalco, Rome, Accademia delle Arti e Nuove Tecnologie, June 10-July 20, 1997

Art Convention Italia (Altamarea), Galleria L’Indicatore 1997

1996-1997
Sixth International Biennial of Cairo. Italian Pavilion (Sesta Biennale Internazionale del Cairo. Padiglione italiano), edited by C. Siniscalco, Cairo (Egypt), The National Centre of Fine Arts, December 1996-February 1997

1996
Autumn Festival 1996 (Argamarte in Scene and Out Scene) (Festival d’Autunno 1996 (Argamarte In Scena e Fuori Scena), edited by C. Siniscalco, Rome Accademia delle Arti e Nuove Tecnologie, October 25-November 25, 1996

L’Altra Arte?, edited by M. Smolizza, Rome, Palazzo Barberini, October 26-November 7, 1996

1995
Journey through Art (Viaggio nell’Italia dell’Arte), edited by A. Cilento, Naples, Ente Autonomo Mostra d’Oltremare-Galleria Mediterranea, July 10-20, traveling in various cities of Italy, 1995

1994
Art in comparison (Arte a confronto), Cesenatico (Fo), Galleria d’Arte “Il Quadrato”, December 10-24, 1994

Remembering Fabrizio Clerici (Ricordando Fabrizio Clerici), edited by F. Zeri, Rome, Accademia Nazionale di San Luca, June 10-30, 1994

Eros Renzetti
It happened to me, one day

Genre: Contemporary art
Publisher: [ Damiani ]
Presentation: Vincenzo Mazzarella
Language / Edition: Italian and English
Translation: Anna Maria Cossiga; Judith Mundell
Edition: 2011
ISBN 978-88-6208-193-1
Pages: 112, ill. 85
Format: 21 x 26,5 cm (8 x 10 ½ inches)
Binding: Hardback
€ 20.00

Artist Eros Renzetti is taking part in the 54th Venice Biennial International Art Exhibition in the Italy Pavilion at the Arsenale, proposed by writer Vincenzo Consolo. A writer and essayist, Consolo is considered to be one of the major contemporary Italian authors and the winner of the prestigious Premio Strega for Nottetempo, casa per casa, in 1992. He comments: “I have chosen to present the painter Eros Renzetti at the Italian Pavillon of the Venice Biennale, at the Corderie, because I find him both greatly impressive and convincing. His figures of men wearing a helmet – similar to the one worn by Dodona’s warrior – seen from the side, his faces, nudes, “tattoos” and above all his colours remind me of the great Surrealist painting of Leonor Fini, Fabrizio Clerici and Alberto Savinio.”
Indeed, Renzetti was a pupil of and assistant to Fabrizio Clerici and closely linked to Leonor Fini, who wrote the catalogue presentation on the occasion of his first exhibition in 1995.


Eros Renzetti
Le trame di Venere

Genere: Arte
Editore: EFFE Fabrizio Fabbri Editore
Presentazione: Nicoletta Campanella
Documentazione: Marco Mestichella
Lingua/Edizione: Italiano e Inglese
Traduzione: Elaine Findlay
Edizione: 2005
ISBN: 88-89298-14-6
Pagine: 104, ill. 24 in nero, 34 a colori
Formato: 24,5×28 cm


Critical Anthology

“I have chosen to present the painter Eros Renzetti at the Italian Pavillon of the Venice Biennale, at the Corderie, because I find him both greatly impressive and convincing. His figures of men wearing a helmet – similar to the one worn by Dodona’s warrior – seen from the side, his faces, nudes, “tattoos” and above all his colours remind me of the great Surrealist painting of Leonor Fini, Fabrizio Clerici and Alberto Savinio.”

Vincenzo Consolo, (presentation by the artist Eros Renzetti at the Venice Biennale), in Art is not ours (L’Arte non è cosa nostra), edited by V. Sgarbi, exhibition catalog (Venice, Corderie dell’Arsenale, Italian Papillon 54th International Art Exhibition, Venice Biennale, 4 June-27 November 2011), Skira, Milan 2011.


[…] Eros Renzetti is the younger friend of Leonor Fini and the artist who associated with her along with Fabrizio Clerici in the Eighties and, subsequently, until her death in Paris in1996.
For him too blue and ultramarine are enchantments he uses to mask his knights; he is certainly one of them and, while painting them, he is reflected in their nature. Renzetti’s painting is opalescent: the bodies merge with the light, the colour takes on pearly reflections. Leonor Fini admired the originality of his anatomical compositions and this is why she made an exception and wrote something for him to be published in one of his catalogues […]

Laura Gavioli, La panthera pardus, il Re Luna, Il San Sebastiano- Fabrizio Clerici, Eros Renzetti, Leonor Fini, in Leonor Fini L’Italienne de Paris, edited by Maria Masau Dan, exhibition catalogue (Trieste, Museo Revoltella, July-October 4 2009), Museo Revoltella, Trieste 2009.


[…] Eros Renzetti paints the disturbing work Testa anatomica in profile, in a hieratic pose, weaving mythology and monochrome in an intense expression of the magic of the cerebral mimetic profoundness of man […]

Marisa Zattini, Nei labirinti iniziatici dei corpi ermetici dell’arte, «graphie» VIII, N° 2, June 2006.


Eros emerged from Le trame di Venere. Giancarlo Renzetti himself acknowledged his new name Eros (about a year ago); I think it was one of his knights who suggested it to him. One of his well-armed male figures. Eros draws his knights in profile: in something more than a hieratic pose (drawn from Greek-Roman sculptures) with the perfume of Venus in fact. And, indeed, he colours them azurite, and more… they do not have the odour of war, those knights of Eros, but the scent of desire, of a passion that is forever frustrated. It is that constantly trembling state of tension… the desire that burns by itself and perpetually, to the point of sublimation, elevation… so as not to remain unsatisfied. Eros’s azurite is lapislazuli, it is ultramarine, it is the sound of the waves of the sea. It takes you to where Venus was born , beyond the red exaltation of the beginning of desire; beyond the dawn, which contains all the trepidation of the coming day. Eros’s knights lead you beyond: beyond the war of passion, of conquest. They have already rushed into war or; they have never rushed into war: certainly they point beyond, due to le trame di Venere. “For me red means exaltation…as a child, although I detested the smell and the taste, I was attracted by the paper of those prismatic, rectangular sweets (I don’t know if they still exist) whose wrappers, held up in front of your eyes, changed your life…”, Eros Renzetti told me one day, “You saw everything red-fuchsia.. while I was playing these games and seeing everything redder…red mouths… So for me red means exaltation, not passion… I don’t think passion has any colour… passion is white… where everything is found and where everything is cancelled out” […]

Nicoletta Campanella, Eros Renzetti. Le trame di Venere, EFFE Fabrizio Fabbri Editore, 2005.


Eros Renzetti reveals a profound unison with the aesthetic ideal of Jean Cocteau. The icy and sensual elegance of his ephebic warriors insinuates elective affinities with the Orphic profiles of le jeune home. But Renzetti’s artistic craft is original and ancient and legitimises the coexistence of glamour iconography and the sacrality of visionary painting.

Mauro Carrera, Uroburo o dell’eterno ritorno (omaggio a Cocteau), in Jean Cocteau, il poeta, il testimone, l’impostore, edited by Mauro Carrera e Elena Fermi, exhibition catalog (Parma, Archivio di Stato October 1-31 2005; Mamiano di Traversetolo, Parma, Fondazione Magnani-Rocca, September 10-November 27 2005), Mattioli 1885, Parma 2005.


Draughtsman, painter, jewellery designer, set designer.
After a sound training first at the Art Institute and then at the Academy of Fine Arts in Rome, the city where he was born and where he works, above all a pupil of and then assistant to Fabrizio Clerici, from whom he learnt anatomy and the secrets of ancient painting, Giancarlo Renzetti eventually came to a metaphysical figural expression bordering on the visionary. With the diptych Il padre putativo I and II, the torsos of mysterious figures drawn from the ancient history of an indefinable epoch are placed in precious display cases like gods to be worshipped.
The work, which is deliberately dark, is dominated by an opalescent green that is made a little paler by a weak light that illuminates the face of what we presume to be a warrior or a sage. In the second, which is sunnier, there is a prevalent yellow light and the protagonist is the profile of a warrior with a magnificent helmet. They are two strong symbols of a father, albeit presumed, who is a guide and a certainty, a dependable life reference.
Therefore, we find the myth of strength and wisdom, which is not to be sought in the images of modernity but in those more solid ones of historical memory.

Massimo Duranti, Un mondo di immagini per chi immagina il mondo. Declinazioni d’arte sull’universo giovanile, exhibition catalogue (Giffoni, Convento di San Francesco, July 19-28 2003), EFFE Fabrizio Fabbri Editore, Perugia 2003.


Mellowness, delicacy, murmur, dream.
And, above all, a deep metabolizing of classical cultural models which encircle and give meaning to all of Giancarlo Renzetti’s work, characterized by a palette aimed at the study of monochrome and the radical choice of the figure as the focus: all solidly underpinned by his natural talent for drawing and proportions.
It is a talent which enables Renzetti to invent his own way of interpreting figure and colour (..). Ultrasuono, for instance, presents us with a silent anatomy, which is spectacularly asexual and situated in a space without place or time, dominated by looming strings which appear to hold up (or move?) the figure that is crumpled on itself. A large shell, which appears to be detached from the context, and whose surreal presence is cumbersome, symbolises a faraway and different dimension, which heralds a distant, “otherworldly” sound: dreamt, feared and unreachable. Or is it, rather, l’estrania anticipated, so that the strings can finally bring the puppets to life? Here is where the sense of drama emerges, although there is no precise script. There is, instead, an evocation of barely hinted at states of mind, of the end which necessarily lies in wait for the spectator and which will inevitably depend on his moods. On the other hand, we note the estrangement of the protagonists of Renzetti’s works from the places they are found in, as though they were disoriented or anyway absent from their habitats, in search of a surreal universe where the traditional functions of all things abide by topsy-turvy rules.

Ernesto D’Orsi, La forma del Sogno. Giancarlo Renzetti, in “Forum”, year III, n° 5-6-7, June, July, August, 2003.


The artists “gives himself with his body” says Valéry. He lends his body to the world and makes it an instrument of painting.
Body-eye, body-flesh, body-mind. The canvas is the sheet on which the painting becomes substance and “real body”, by means of a physical process of subtraction and sedimentation, and a mental process of drive and projective analysis of ideas being enacted.
Today painting still proves to be an unparalleled custodian of this progressive dynamic: where photography splinters painting fluidly follows the movement of its continual self-generation, like a performative event. Giancarlo Renzetti controls the movement of colour, which is his interpretation of painting, with total mastery and drains every surface to the point of evaporating its lines, shadows and lights, containing the energy of the changing of colour in the densest and most compressed shades of shadow. Renzetti again abolishes the palette, the legacy of a plurichrome culture of painting, once and for all, and settles on the study of monochrome, a radical choice in line with his rigidity in choosing the figure to be the focus.
Colour for Renzetti is enervated on the chromatic scale in every shade of monotone.
His work therefore exhilarates the dialogue between black and light, between blurred and defined. It is this same mellowness that is found again in his works executed in pencil, in his black drawings, which thus even further connote his choice of monochrome, from the background to the only light of the figure. It is an exploration of a mystery that is central to art: the black within the colour, the shadow within the light. Black is the place of the prism where colours are cancelled, it is the symbol of mourning or of death, of the chaos of original night, of the indistinct. Drawing on ordinary language art has traced associations with melancholy (black moods, black ideas, black bile), with inebriation, with magic. His anthropomorphical or mythological figurations do not reconstruct a past made up of citations which are an end in themselves, which have their raison d’etre by virtue of an archaeological culture, and nor do they make of history a pile of ruins or a literary prosthesis but are means of masking a thought (mimesis understood as its linguistic relationship with mieisthai, the actor’s mask) that painting as alibi has always expressed in its metaphorical, metonymic and metaphysical reality.
Rather than a revanchism of painting Renzetti’s work expresses the hedonism of the painting it celebrates and consecrates the state of art as a biological derivation of the artist’s status in dexterity, corporeality, perceptive ability, but above all in a mental process, in a Leonardian sense, although of matter and material.

Angelo Capasso, Ritratto di Renzetti in abito scuro, in “Arte In”, n° 67, June, July 2000. Partly published in the presentation of the exhibition Giancarlo Renzetti, J.F. Kennedy Airport, June, July, 1999.


The artist Giancarlo Renzetti has acquired, during the course of his comparatively few years of activity, such knowledge of ancient painting techniques, which are nowadays usually neglected in favour of the work’s “concept” and “meaning”, that he is considered to be a true exception among young Italian artists. Besides, his intelligent dexterity, his exceptional technique, and his ‘craft’, in the noblest sense of the term, would have no meaning were they not enlivened by the inspiration and original compositions of his works, which are genuinely unusual and personal. The artist isolates his characters in immense spaces and transforms them into solitary pawns on the chessboard of a world where man is left to his own devices, without any possibility to communicate, sensitive only to the voices of memories and the sound of ancient music. In search, perhaps, of himself. Like our society and art today, at the close of this century.

Carmine Siniscalco, Sesta Biennale Internazionale del Cairo, Italian Pavilion, exhibition catalogue (Cairo, The National Centre of Fine Arts, December 1996 – February 1997), Arab Republic of Egypt- Ministry of Culture- National Centre of Fine Arts, 1996.


The techniques used by Renzetti in his nine paintings dating from between 1989 and 1995 are more laborious and, in part, revive the painting tradition of the old masters. His astonishingly beautiful works on paper, like those in the Cardinali series, provide a counterpoint to the vast canvases. Here the scowling expressions, the decrepitude, the stare of prophets that is transformed into a conscious flicker before death contains something which is perturbing and profoundly poetic. In these works, rather than being constituted by a recognisable iconographic motif, the internal bond is, instead, rendered by proposing the magical atmosphere of an apparition in figural terms.
The characters seem to be bathed in a pearly light which transforms the acid green, earthy coral, opaline purple into natural shades, which succeed in emphasising the strange atmosphere of the scene. Thanks to the light the bodies of the figures have a play of volumes which appear to be inwardly released and imprisoned by a transparent film, almost as though it were glass. Renzetti, who was the assistant of Fabrizio Clerici, one of the protagonists of visionary art, for many years, despite assimilating some of the technical aspects of his teacher, succeeds in elaborating an original range of forms and themes freed of any narrative intent, but only partly influenced by his training as a set designer.

Ines Millesimi, Renzetti, in “Artel”, no. 27, July, 1995.

Bibliography

2016

Giovanbattista Brambilla, David Bowie Is, in “Pride”, 199, June 2016, p. 18.
Paolo Conti, «Non mi compete» senza dignità, in “Corriere della Sera”, May 22, 2016 p. 1.
Paolo Conti, Ci risiamo, è una Madonna «Pasquino», in “Corriere della Sera”, May 16, 2016 p. 1.

2015
Franco Di Matteo, Una mostra collettiva, a Roma, rende omaggio a Pier Paolo Pasolini, “International Urbis et Artis”, May-June 2015, pp. 138-139.

2014-2015
Daniela Delcorno Branca, Alcina e Melissa: le fate del Furioso o la rilettura di un topos, in L’Orlando furioso. Incantamenti, passioni e follie. L’Arte contemporanea legge l’Ariosto, edited by Sandro Parmigiani, exhibition catalog (Reggio Emilia, Palazzo Magnani, October 4, 2014-January 11, 2015), Silvana Editoriale, Milan 2014.

2012

Lorenzo Canova, Riflessi e segni sulla rètina lucente, in La Rètina lucente, exhibition catalog (LVII Mostra Nazionale ‘Città di Termoli’, Galleria Civica d’Arte Contemporanea, July 22-September 16 2012), Rome, Primamusa art publisher, 2012.
Giuseppina Julia, Letter to Eros, in Fabrizio Clerici. Nello spazio, nel mito, edited by I. Millesimi, exhibition catalog (Rocca di Umbertide. Centro per l’Arte Contemporanea, June 30-September 30 2012), Peruzzi Editore, Città di Castello 2012.
Vincenzo Mazzarella, Nella mia mano stanca, in Eros Renzetti Lucha Libre, edited by V. Mazzarella, exhibition catalog (Rome, Palazzetto Art Gallery, May 9 -12 June 2012), Palazzetto Art Gallery, Rome 2012.
Ines Millesimi, Renzetti e la metafora del C.Q.F.P., in Eros Renzetti Lucha Libre, edited by V. Mazzarella, exhibition catalog (Rome, Palazzetto Art Gallery, May 9 -12 June 2012), Palazzetto Art Gallery, Rome 2012.
Corrado Premuda, Nell’arte di Eros Renzetti, in Eros Renzetti Lucha Libre, edited by V. Mazzarella, exhibition catalog (Rome, Palazzetto Art Gallery, May 9 -12 June 2012), Palazzetto Art Gallery, Rome 2012.
Angela Guarino, La pittura colta, in Eros Renzetti Lucha Libre, edited by V. Mazzarella, exhibition catalog (Rome, Palazzetto Art Gallery, May 9 -12 June 2012), Palazzetto Art Gallery, Rome 2012.
– Il Giornale dell’Arte Vedere a Rome, supplement to “Il Giornale dell’Arte”, June, no. 39, 2012, p. 10.
-Il Giornale dell’Arte Vedere a Rome, supplement to “Il Giornale dell’Arte”, February, no. 28, 2012, p. p. 18.

2011
Vincenzo Consolo, (presentation by the artist Eros Renzetti at the Venice Biennale), in “Art is not ours” (L’Arte non è cosa nostra), edited by V. Sgarbi, exhibition catalog (Venice, Corderie dell’Arsenale, Italian Papillon 54th International Art Exhibition, Venice Biennale, June 4-November 27, 2011), Skira, Milan 2011.
Vincenzo Mazzarella, The Tale of the Completed Boy, in Eros Renzetti. It happened to me, one day, Damiani Editore, Bologna 2011.
Fabrizio Clerici (alias V. Mazzarella), It happened to me, one day, in Eros Renzetti. It happened to me, one day, Damiani Editore, Bologna 2011.
Giuseppina Julia, It happened to me, one day, in Eros Renzetti. It happened to me, one day, Damiani Editore, Bologna 2011.
Serdar Kayra, The Tale of the Completed Boy, in Eros Renzetti. It happened to me, one day, Damiani Editore, Bologna 2011.
Ines Millesimi, Biography, in The Tale of the Completed Boy, in Eros Renzetti. It happened to me, one day, Damiani Editore, Bologna 2011.
Quindici artisti a Tel Aviv per la Shoah, in “Il Messaggero”, January 24, 2011.

2009
Arianna Boria, “Dorfles, quella Leonor Fini non è per bene”, in “Il Piccolo”, August 28, 2009.
Corrado Premuda, Il ritorno di Leonor Fini in Italia, in “La Voce in più – Cultura”, supplement to “La Voce del Popolo”, Fiume (Croazia), July 18, 2009.
Laura Gavioli, La panthera pardus, il Re Luna, Il San Sebastiano-Fabrizio Clerici, Eros Renzetti, Leonor Fini, in Leonor Fini L’Italienne de Paris, edited by M. Masau Dan, exhibition catalog (Trieste, Museo Revoltella, July 4- October 4, 2009), Revoltella Editore, Trieste 2009.

2008
Mauro Carrera, Uroburo o «de l’éternel retour» (omaggio a Cocteau) Jean Cocteau le joli coeur. Tribute “to fashion” a deceiver (Jean Cocteau le joli coeur. Omaggio ”alla moda” di un seduttore), edited by M. Carrera e E. Fermi, exhibition catalog (Milan, Palazzo delle Stelline, Centre culturel français, October 24-December 4, 2008), Edizioni dell’Uroburo, Parma 2008.

2007
Marco Carapezza, Voyage à lîle de Motya, in Fabrizio Clerici. Opere 1937-1992, edited by S. Troisi, exhibition catalog (Convento del Carmine, July 7-October 28, 2007), Sellerio, Palermo 2007.

2006
Marisa Zattini, Nei labirinti iniziatici dei corpi ermetici dell’arte, «graphie» VIII, June 2, 2006.
– “Ulisse”, 257, January 2006.
-Arte, 392, April 2006.
-Arte, 393, May 2006.

2005-2006 

Nicoletta Campanella, Eros Renzetti. Le trame di Venere, EFFE Fabrizio Fabbri Editore, 2005.
Interview: Eros Renzetti. Lo stile dell’arte, in Tutto Tabacco, 52, 1, January 2006.

2005
Mauro Carrera, Uroburo o dell’eterno ritorno (omaggio a Cocteau), in Jean Cocteau, il poeta, il testimone, l’impostore, edited by Mauro Carrera e Elena Fermi, exhibition catalog (Mamiano di Traversetolo, Parma, Fondazione Magnani-Rocca, September 10-November 27 2005), Mattioli 1885, Parma 2005.
Elena Fermi, Gli Artisti di Uroburo, in Uroburo o dell’eterno ritorno (omaggio a Cocteau), edited by Mauro Carrera e Elena Fermi, exhibition catalog (Jean Cocteau, il poeta, il testimone, l’impostore, Mamiano di Traversetolo, Parma, Fondazione Magnani-Rocca, September 10-November 27 2005), Mattioli 1885, Parma 2005.

2004
Carmine Siniscalco, Introduzione, in Salone di maggio. La natura e l’uomo, exhibition catalogue (Rome, Complesso del Vittoriano, May 7-26 2004), Palombi Editori, Roma 2004.
Marco Carapezza, Le architetture narrative di Fabrizio Clerici, in Fabrizio Clerici.Una retrospettiva, edited by Claudio Strinati and Maria Teresa Benedetti, exhibition catalogue (Rome, Complesso del Vittoriano, February 14-29), EFFE Fabrizio Fabbri Editore, Perugia 2004.

2003
Massimo Duranti, Un mondo di immagini per chi immagina il mondo. Declinazioni d’arte sull’universo giovanile, exhibition catalogue (Giffoni, Convento di San Francesco, July 19-28 2003), EFFE Fabrizio Fabbri Editore, Perugia 2003.
Antonella Pesola, apparatus in Un mondo di immagini per chi immagina il mondo. Declinazioni d’arte sull’universo giovanile, exhibition catalogue (Giffoni, Convento di San Francesco, July 19-28 2003), EFFE Fabrizio Fabbri Editore, Perugia 2003.
– “Ulisse”, year XXIII, no. 232, July 2003.
Ernesto D’Orsi, La forma del Sogno. Giancarlo Renzetti, in “Forum”, III, no. 5-6-7, June, July, August 2003.

2000
Angelo Capasso, Ritratto di Renzetti in abito scuro, in “Arte In”, no. 67, June, July 2000.
– Cronache AZ, no. 677, February 29 2000.
Il “pianeta aviazione” nelle schede di Air press, Rome, Editoriale Aeronautica 2000.
– “Chi”, no. 29, July 19 2000.
Angelo Capasso, Corpo e tela, in “Modus vivendi”, no. 25, August, September 2000.
Antonella Pesola, ad vocem 10 Anni di Alitalia per l’Arte, Rome, Alitalia Istitutional Relations and Communications 2000.
– Il Giornale dell’Arte Contemporanea, supplement no. 1 in “Il Giornale dell’Arte”, no. 196, February 2000.

1999
Massimo Duranti, Artisti per la 705ª Perdonanza Celestiniana, exhibition catalogue (L’Aquila, Fortezza Spagnola, August 14-September 26, 1999) Alitalia 1999.
Angelo Capasso, Giancarlo Renzetti, (depliant), J.F. Kennedy Airport, New York, June, July 1999.
– “Arte”, no. 311, July 1999.
– “Arte”, no. 312, August 1999.
– “Ulisse 2000”, no. 184, July 1999.
– “Arte In”, no. 61, June, July 1999.

1998-1999
Massimo Duranti, Trenta artisti per Umbria Jazz Winter, exhibition catalogue (Orvieto, Sala Expò, Palazzo del Popolo, December 28 1998-January 10 1999) Alitalia, 1998.

1998
Massimo Duranti, (prolusion), Ventiquattro artisti per Umbria Jazz, exhibition catalogue (Perugia, Rocca Paolina, July 10-19 1998) Alitalia 1998.
– “Arrivederci”, no. 100, June 1998.
– “Arrivederci”, no. 106, December 1998.
– “Freccia Alata News”, no. 4, 1998.
– “Quadri & Sculture”, no. 31, June, July 1998.
– “Arte”, no. 299, July 1998.

1997
Francesco Gallo, Art Convention Italia – Altamarea, Edizioni Bora, Bologna 1997.
– “Quadri & Sculture”, no. 25, April, May, no. 26, June, July 1997.
Carmine Siniscalco, A.R.G.A.M. e Primaverile, in A.R.G.A.M., 1997. S.V.P. Primaverile Romana 1997. Segno Valore Pittura, exhibition catalogue (Rome, Segnalazioni, Accademia delle Arti e nuove tecnologie, June 10-July 20 1997), Associazione Romana Gallerie d’Arte Moderna, Roma 1997.
– Mostre estate, (brochure) published by Comune di Rome 1997.

1996- 1997

Carmine Siniscalco, Sesta Biennale Internazionale del Cairo, Italian Pavilion, exhibition catalogue (Cairo, The National Centre of Fine Arts, December 1996 – February 1997), Arab Republic of Egypt- Ministry of Culture- National Centre of Fine Arts, 1996.

1996
Charles Reynaud des Sablons, Giancarlo Renzetti. Un jeune classique, in “The Best”, no. 44, 1996.
– “Psicoanalisi Contro”, year 13, no. 9, 1996.
Angelo Capasso, Giancarlo Renzetti: segni-disegni, in “Cahiers d’art”, no. 16, 1996.
Gianfranco Bartalotta, Teatro: Un “festival d’autunno” a Rome, in “Terzoocchio”, no. 81, December 1996.
Matteo Smolizza, L’Altra Arte ?, exhibition catalogue (Rome, Palazzo Barberini, October 26, November 7, 1996), Quadri & Sculture, Roma 1996.
– Galleria Italia, supplement to “Quadri & Sculture”, 1996.
– “Quadri & Sculture”, n. 18, February, March, 1996.
Renzetti in lotta con la metafisica, in “Arte”, no. 273, May, 1996.
Renzetti continua a cesellare i suoi silenzi, in “Arte”, no. 274, June, 1996.

1995
Vito Apuleo, Giancarlo Renzetti, in “Il Messaggero”, July 3 1995.
Gabriele Simongini, Giancarlo Renzetti-Contemplazione per penetrare realtà interiori, in “Il Tempo”, July 13 1995.
Ines Millesimi, Giancarlo Renzetti, in “Artel”, no. 27, July 1995.
Francesco Revel, Renzetti, il fotografo delle emozioni-Metafisica, in Catalogo dell’Arte Moderna Italiana, no. 31, Editoriale Giorgio Mondadori, Milan 1995.
Andrea Cilento,Viaggio nell’Italia dell’Arte, travelling exhibition catalogue, Naples, Galleria Mediterranea, July, 10-20 1995.
– “Rome c’è”, 29th of June, July 5 1995.
– Vernissage, supplement to “Il Giornale dell’Arte”, no. 134, June 1995.
– “Quadri & Sculture”, no. 12, January, February; no. 14 1995, May, June and supplement; no. 15, July, August; no. 16, October, November 1995.

1994
Francesco Revel, Renzetti, il fotografo delle emozioni- Metafisica, in “Quadri & Sculture”, no. 7, supplement, 1994.
Carlo A. D’Emilio, Giancarlo Renzetti. Uomini-archetipi, in “Quadri & Sculture”, no. 9, 1994.
Francesco Revel, Realismo visionario di Giancarlo Renzetti-Individua atmosfera, in “Quadri & Sculture”, no. 9, supplement, 1994.
Costanzo Costantini, Omaggio a Fabrizio Clerici-Il pennello è come un laser, in “Il Messaggero”, June 20 1994.
Mario Quesada, Clerici, pittore dell’anima, in “la Repubblica”, June 30 1994.

1991
G. Del., Pasifae approda in terra di Sardegna, in “Il Giornale”, June 29 1991.
Franco Manzoni, Pasifae, perversa regina, in “Corriere della Sera”, July 11 1991.
Gianfranco Capitta, Nel segno del toro, in “Il Manifesto”, July 14 1991.
Maria Teresa Giannoni, Per amore di un toro, in “Il Tirreno”, July 15 1991.
Marco Manca, De Montherlant, inno alla voglia, in “L’Unione Sarda”, July 15 1991.
Franco Quadri, L’amante del dio Toro, in “la Repubblica”, July 17 1991.
Dante Cappelletti, “Pasifae” rito notturno ricordando Coppola, in “Il Tempo”, July 17 1991.
Giampaolo Spinato, Pasifae regina di Creta, in “Tutto Milan – la Repubblica”, July 18-24 1991.
Maria Grazia Gregori, La Francia degli anni Trenta dietro il fatale amore di Pasifae, in “L’Unità”, July 22 1991.
Magda Poli, Pasifae, L’amore impossibile, in “Corriere della Sera”, July 22 1991.
Ugo Volli, In palcoscenico, in “la Repubblica”, August 20 1991.
Notte dei poeti e mito di Minosse, in “Espresso sera”, July 11 1991.
G. Del., In Sardegna Avogadro fa rivivere sulla scena il mito di “Pasifae”, in “Il Giornale”, July 14 1991.

1984
Fabrizio Clerici, Per i vent’anni di Eros [Un Caravaggio in via Ripetta], (written for “Il Messaggero”, not published).

Yearbooks of Modern and Contemporary Art
– ad vocem, in Catalogo dell’Arte Moderna Italiana, no. 31, 1995; no. 32, 1996; no. 33, 1997; no. 34, 1998 Editoriale Giorgio Mondadori, Milan.
– ad vocem, in “Art Diary-Italia”, Flash Art, Milan 1996.
– ad vocem, in Top Arts. Catalogo Nazionale dell’Arte Contemporanea, Rossano Massaccesi Editore, Osimo, 1997.
– ad vocem, in Annuario d’Arte Moderna-Artisti Contemporanei 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, Editrice A.C.C.A. in… Arte, Rome.
– ad vocem, in Comanducci. Dizionario Universale.
– ad vocem, in “Art Diary International”, Flash Art, Milan, 2008-2009.